22nd Sep 2014
Hello, long-ignored followers! We’re sorry for being absent (well, mostly I am - it’s all my fault) but we do have an update for you. After an extended period of painting, sawing, staining, gluing, wiring, and bargain-hunting, I finally have a fully functional office space (and spare bedroom). Here are some shots of the final product. Highlights include: a stylish and functional bike rack, a custom-built desk with height and angle adjustment, an assortment of lights for any task, an industrial rolling storage rack, a wall for our degree collection, and sturdy, second-hand seating. I’m still working on an overall picture - it’s hard to get everything in there!
-Mike

Hello, long-ignored followers! We’re sorry for being absent (well, mostly I am - it’s all my fault) but we do have an update for you. After an extended period of painting, sawing, staining, gluing, wiring, and bargain-hunting, I finally have a fully functional office space (and spare bedroom). Here are some shots of the final product. Highlights include: a stylish and functional bike rack, a custom-built desk with height and angle adjustment, an assortment of lights for any task, an industrial rolling storage rack, a wall for our degree collection, and sturdy, second-hand seating. I’m still working on an overall picture - it’s hard to get everything in there!

-Mike

23rd Aug 2014
Full post on Wears and Listens.

Full post on Wears and Listens.

17th Aug 2014
One of our favourite parts of a St. John’s summer is Eastern Edge’s Art Marathon Festival, so named for a 24-hour marathon of art-making that’s been taking place for more than 15 years. Since its inception, the marathon has expanded into nearly a week of activities: workshops, performances, talks, and installations. This year, the organizers accepted submissions for a festival zine entitled Sweet Tooth, centered around themes of indulgence, sweetness, and excess. I didn’t have anything to submit at the time, but thanks to Katie’s collection of vintage magazines and a stroke of inspiration, I managed to put a few arrangements together. When I finally picked up a copy I was surprised to see both my submissions on a great two-page spread! While I get the feeling there were few (if any) rejections, it does feel good to see your work in print.
-Mike

One of our favourite parts of a St. John’s summer is Eastern Edge’s Art Marathon Festival, so named for a 24-hour marathon of art-making that’s been taking place for more than 15 years. Since its inception, the marathon has expanded into nearly a week of activities: workshops, performances, talks, and installations. This year, the organizers accepted submissions for a festival zine entitled Sweet Tooth, centered around themes of indulgence, sweetness, and excess. I didn’t have anything to submit at the time, but thanks to Katie’s collection of vintage magazines and a stroke of inspiration, I managed to put a few arrangements together. When I finally picked up a copy I was surprised to see both my submissions on a great two-page spread! While I get the feeling there were few (if any) rejections, it does feel good to see your work in print.

-Mike

14th Aug 2014
On Being Bad At The Things You LoveThis is my little temporary workspace. It’s in our cozy kitchen, close to the coffee pot and the snack cupboard. Mike and I moved our small kitchen table out, and he’s letting me use his drafting table. On it are my paints, pens, pencils, paper, drawing tablet, computer, and a DIY lightbox Mike made for me (isn’t he the best?). I’ve made a pretty nice space for myself, I’ve got all the supplies I need, and I even have a few clever ideas, but there’s one big problem - I’m terrible at art.Let me rephrase, I feel like I’m terrible at art, or anything even remotely creative. I love making things, creating, but whenever I do I’m incredibly judgemental of what I’ve made. I look at so many amazing artists and think, “My stuff is total crap compared to that!” I haven’t been drawing/painting for long, but I already expect myself to be as good as my favourite artists. It’s hard to be “bad” at something you love (“bad” being completely subjective). Sure, you know you’ll get the hang of it over time, but the practicing phase sucks. Sometimes I feel like practicing is just an exercise in failure. And after so many failures, I don’t even want to try anymore.
When art started to become a chore to me, something to avoid, I was pretty bummed out. What happened? What changed? I realized I had made the end results more important than the process. I cared more about what I produced rather than my experience producing it. You know that quote about the journey being more important than the destination? I think that applies here.
My new motto? It’s okay to be bad. Being bad is better than avoiding something you love for fear of failure. Eventually you’ll get there. Enjoy it for what it is. Be kind to yourself.
-Katie

On Being Bad At The Things You Love

This is my little temporary workspace. It’s in our cozy kitchen, close to the coffee pot and the snack cupboard. Mike and I moved our small kitchen table out, and he’s letting me use his drafting table. On it are my paints, pens, pencils, paper, drawing tablet, computer, and a DIY lightbox Mike made for me (isn’t he the best?). I’ve made a pretty nice space for myself, I’ve got all the supplies I need, and I even have a few clever ideas, but there’s one big problem - I’m terrible at art.

Let me rephrase, I feel like I’m terrible at art, or anything even remotely creative. I love making things, creating, but whenever I do I’m incredibly judgemental of what I’ve made. I look at so many amazing artists and think, “My stuff is total crap compared to that!” I haven’t been drawing/painting for long, but I already expect myself to be as good as my favourite artists. 

It’s hard to be “bad” at something you love (“bad” being completely subjective). Sure, you know you’ll get the hang of it over time, but the practicing phase sucks. Sometimes I feel like practicing is just an exercise in failure. And after so many failures, I don’t even want to try anymore.

When art started to become a chore to me, something to avoid, I was pretty bummed out. What happened? What changed? I realized I had made the end results more important than the process. I cared more about what I produced rather than my experience producing it. You know that quote about the journey being more important than the destination? I think that applies here.

My new motto? It’s okay to be bad. Being bad is better than avoiding something you love for fear of failure. Eventually you’ll get there. Enjoy it for what it is. Be kind to yourself.

-Katie

10th Aug 2014
The Most Important Meal
Mike and I used to go out to breakfast/brunch at least once a week. It was one of our favourite traditions. At one particular diner in Halifax (The Armview) we became regulars, coming by each week to order a benny and drink cup after cup of hot coffee. When we left for St. John’s we had to say goodbye to The Armview. We thought about trying to find a similar spot here, but ultimately decided we would turn our kitchen into our new favourite diner. This fit well with our journey to a simpler life, and we were both excited to try out some new recipes. So far we’ve made our own bagels, granola, and yogurt. We’ve also learned how to properly poach an egg and make a killer hollandaise. It’s a limited menu I admit, but our kitchen is the only spot in town that knows just how I like my bagels toasted, or just how much maple syrup Mike likes in his granola (hint: it’s a lot). -Katie

The Most Important Meal

Mike and I used to go out to breakfast/brunch at least once a week. It was one of our favourite traditions. At one particular diner in Halifax (The Armview) we became regulars, coming by each week to order a benny and drink cup after cup of hot coffee. When we left for St. John’s we had to say goodbye to The Armview. We thought about trying to find a similar spot here, but ultimately decided we would turn our kitchen into our new favourite diner. This fit well with our journey to a simpler life, and we were both excited to try out some new recipes. So far we’ve made our own bagels, granola, and yogurt. We’ve also learned how to properly poach an egg and make a killer hollandaise. It’s a limited menu I admit, but our kitchen is the only spot in town that knows just how I like my bagels toasted, or just how much maple syrup Mike likes in his granola (hint: it’s a lot). 

-Katie

4th Aug 2014
More here

More here

30th Jul 2014

imageimage

image

imageStart Small
I think change comes easiest when it’s incremental - little modifications here and there that build up over time. Mike and I are pretty realistic when it comes to our journey to a simpler life. Sure, we’d love to go out and buy a smoker and start making our own bacon, but we’ll probably have more success with our lifestyle change if we start small.

Read More

29th Jul 2014

image

Our Time to Realign
Mike and I decided to take this summer off. No work, no school, just rest, relaxation, and reflection. I’m a big proponent of self-care, and I honestly think this is one of the best decisions we’ve ever made for ourselves. After graduation, we were both burnt out. We knew we needed to take some time off to get healthy – mind, body, and soul.

Read More

27th Jul 2014
Hot days means cold soup. I’ve always wanted to make gazpacho and was totally thrilled with the super simple recipe I found in this cookbook (side note: this cookbook is amazing and I totally recommend picking it up - such pretty illustrations and good recipes!). All you have to do is chop up 6 ripe peeled tomatoes, 1 cucumber, 1 onion, and 1 red pepper. Then put all the chopped up veggies in a food processor/blender with some water, 3 tbsp olive oil, S+P, and hot sauce. I also added in some basil and mint leaves to give it an extra bit of flavour, but there are a ton of different spice combinations you could try to make it your own. Blend until it reaches the desired consistency. Chill in the fridge and serve with some ice cubes. This recipe makes about 4 servings. The soup was really refreshing and works well paired with a yummy salad or sandwich (we made cubanos). No cooking or hot stove required - definitely what I call the perfect summer recipe!
-Katie

Hot days means cold soup. I’ve always wanted to make gazpacho and was totally thrilled with the super simple recipe I found in this cookbook (side note: this cookbook is amazing and I totally recommend picking it up - such pretty illustrations and good recipes!). All you have to do is chop up 6 ripe peeled tomatoes, 1 cucumber, 1 onion, and 1 red pepper. Then put all the chopped up veggies in a food processor/blender with some water, 3 tbsp olive oil, S+P, and hot sauce. I also added in some basil and mint leaves to give it an extra bit of flavour, but there are a ton of different spice combinations you could try to make it your own. Blend until it reaches the desired consistency. Chill in the fridge and serve with some ice cubes. This recipe makes about 4 servings. The soup was really refreshing and works well paired with a yummy salad or sandwich (we made cubanos). No cooking or hot stove required - definitely what I call the perfect summer recipe!

-Katie

13th Jul 2014
See the full post on Wears & Listens
-Katie

See the full post on Wears & Listens

-Katie

10th Jul 2014
Rhubarb is a hardy plant that, in my experience, practically grows itself. The catch is its extremely bitter taste, which people often cut with strawberries in jams and crumbles. When my parents brought me a bunch last week, I wanted to try something new. My search turned up this recipe for a rhubarb nut loaf. The recipe was surprisingly simple, even though I had to make a few substitutions: milk + lemon juice for buttermilk, and walnuts for pecans. I also baked for only 60 minutes at a lower temperature, because I’m pretty sure our oven runs very hot. The result was pretty delicious, and you could easily omit the icing if you’ve got calories on the brain. So, if you ever find yourself with a rhubarb problem, I’ve got your rhubarb solution.
-Mike

Rhubarb is a hardy plant that, in my experience, practically grows itself. The catch is its extremely bitter taste, which people often cut with strawberries in jams and crumbles. When my parents brought me a bunch last week, I wanted to try something new. My search turned up this recipe for a rhubarb nut loaf. The recipe was surprisingly simple, even though I had to make a few substitutions: milk + lemon juice for buttermilk, and walnuts for pecans. I also baked for only 60 minutes at a lower temperature, because I’m pretty sure our oven runs very hot. The result was pretty delicious, and you could easily omit the icing if you’ve got calories on the brain. So, if you ever find yourself with a rhubarb problem, I’ve got your rhubarb solution.

-Mike

6th Jul 2014
What about you, what have you been up to lately?

What about you, what have you been up to lately?

1st Jul 2014
Ch-ch-ch-check out the full post on Katie’s new side blog, Wears & Listens

Ch-ch-ch-check out the full post on Katie’s new side blog, Wears & Listens

25th Jun 2014
Today’s post is the quintessential bar and bean. We put these together after strokes of inspiration and/or motivation from two unlikely places. Katie’s concoction, a pineapple basil caesar, comes from the bar. After seeing Clint Pattemore hype his book on the only television channel we currently pick up, Katie was inspired to mix one up. This one was only named on the show, but we found a recipe and Katie pulled it off beautifully. My dish is a product of the bean, the coffee bean to be exact. Lady fingers were on sale this week (sometimes that’s all it takes) and I finally had to try the Italian dessert: tiramisu. This one was actually easier than I expected; I cobbled together a recipe based on the ingredients we had, and the result was the perfect combination of coffee-soaked cake and rich, cheesy cream.
-Mike

Today’s post is the quintessential bar and bean. We put these together after strokes of inspiration and/or motivation from two unlikely places. Katie’s concoction, a pineapple basil caesar, comes from the bar. After seeing Clint Pattemore hype his book on the only television channel we currently pick up, Katie was inspired to mix one up. This one was only named on the show, but we found a recipe and Katie pulled it off beautifully. My dish is a product of the bean, the coffee bean to be exact. Lady fingers were on sale this week (sometimes that’s all it takes) and I finally had to try the Italian dessert: tiramisu. This one was actually easier than I expected; I cobbled together a recipe based on the ingredients we had, and the result was the perfect combination of coffee-soaked cake and rich, cheesy cream.

-Mike

20th Jun 2014
We’re all about easy, tasty food here at the bar and bean. And what could be easier and tastier than skewers? At your next BBQ try ditching the hamburger for this delicious veggie option. Take a few bamboo skewers and pierce on some cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, pressed (extra firm) tofu cubes, green pepper, red onion, and baby potatoes (microwave the potatoes a few minutes in the microwave first to ensure they cook all the way through). Then generously brush on some BBQ sauce to coat and place on the grill. While you’re at it, throw some corn on the cob (still in its husk) on there too. The resulting dinner will be so good you’ll be wishing you could grill all year round. 
-Katie

We’re all about easy, tasty food here at the bar and bean. And what could be easier and tastier than skewers? At your next BBQ try ditching the hamburger for this delicious veggie option. Take a few bamboo skewers and pierce on some cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, pressed (extra firm) tofu cubes, green pepper, red onion, and baby potatoes (microwave the potatoes a few minutes in the microwave first to ensure they cook all the way through). Then generously brush on some BBQ sauce to coat and place on the grill. While you’re at it, throw some corn on the cob (still in its husk) on there too. The resulting dinner will be so good you’ll be wishing you could grill all year round. 

-Katie